July 27th, 2017

How to Safely View the Solar Eclipse This Year

 

Throughout history, solar eclipses have left people in awe as the Earth plunges into darkness during daylight hours. A solar eclipse occurs as the moon passes directly in front of the sun, blocking its light either partially or in full. This causes a shadow to appear on part the Earth, and those within the shadow experience this as an eclipse.

If you’re feeling intrigued by the incredible science behind this phenomenon, why not gather a group of friends together on the morning of August 21st to take in the spectacle of an eclipse yourselves? Throwing a Solar Eclipse Viewing Event is a unique and fun way to celebrate this rare occurrence.

Fill up some thermoses with coffee and hot chocolate, grab some delicious pastries, and set up comfortable folding chairs at your location to wait for the eclipse. Be sure to look at the weather forecast ahead of time to avoid cloudy skies, and pick an outdoor space with a clear view of where the sun will be. If there’s a chance of clouds, hop in the car and program your GPS to a spot with sunnier weather–you’ll definitely want to find clear skies for this event. Bring along portable speakers and a fun playlist (Dark Side of the Moon, anyone?) to give your gathering a true celebratory ambiance. And don’t forget the sunscreen–you’ll need it even while the sun starts to go dark!

Most importantly, bring along EclipSmart Solar Safe Shades to keep your eyes safe while you observe the eclipse. Never look directly at any part of the sun without proper protective equipment, as it can cause irreversible damage and even blindness.

Where Are You Viewing the Eclipse From?

While this eclipse will only reach totality over parts of the United States, we will still be able to observe a significant partial eclipse from Canada. If you’re curious about how much of the solar eclipse you’ll see and when you’ll be able to see the sun at the peak of the eclipse, here’s a quick list showing what you’ll be able to expect! Remember, the further from the path of totality you are, the less the sun will appear to be covered. For this August 21, 2017 solar eclipse, the path of totality will curve from the Pacific Northwest through the middle of the United States to the South-Eastern Seaboard.

Victoria: 91% of the sun will be covered at 10:20 am

Vancouver: 88% of the sun will be covered at 10:21 am

Calgary: 81% of the sun will be covered at 10:20 am

Edmonton: 75% of the sun will be covered at 11:35 am

Regina: 79% of the sun will be covered at 11:46 am

Winnipeg: 76% of the sun will be covered at 12:57 pm

Toronto: 76% of the sun will be covered at 2:32 pm

St. Johns: 43% of the sun will be covered at 4:29 pm

In the meantime, brush up on your solar eclipse knowledge, so you’ll know what to expect (and to impress your friends while you wait!)

10 Fun Facts About Solar Eclipses

  1. There are three different types of solar eclipses: a partial eclipse where the moon only covers some of the sun; a total eclipse, where the entire sun is covered and only the corona is visible; and an annular eclipse, which occurs when the moon covers the sun, but is at a wide point of its orbit, causing the sun to shine around the moon.
  2. When the moon blocks out the entire sun at the peak of a total eclipse, it is called ‘totality.’
  3. There are usually two to five solar eclipses per year, but most are not total eclipses, and many fall over unpopulated areas.
  4. It’s impossible to view a total solar eclipse from the North or South Pole.
  5. A total solar eclipse never lasts longer than 7.5 minutes.
  6. Temperatures can fall by up to 20 degrees as darkness falls during totality.
  7. Every 18 years and 11 days, an almost identical eclipse will happen. This is called the Saros Cycle.
  8. The widest possible path of totality is 269 kilometers across, though it is often quite a bit thinner – around 160 kilometers on average. This eclipse’s path of totality will be thinner than usual – about 115 km wide.
  9. The only time that we can view the sun’s corona with the naked eye is during a total solar eclipse.
  10. If you look directly at any part of the sun during an eclipse, no matter how small the visible sliver is, it can cause vision loss or other damage to your eyes due to the extreme intensity of the light. Always use proper protective gear to observe the sun!

How to Use the Solar Shades

EclipSmart Solar Safe Shades block the harmful ultraviolet and infrared rays of the light that comes from the sun and are essential for viewing the partial phases that precede and follow totality. You can follow the moon’s progression across the sun by looking through these glasses every few minutes during the partial phases. EclipSmart Solar Safe Shades are lab tested and meet the new ISO 12312-2 requirements (Filters for Direct Observation of the Sun). It is extremely important to remember that only during complete totality may you look at the sun without EclipSmart Solar Safe Shades. Never look directly at the partial phases of the eclipse without EclipSmart Solar Safe Shades.

Limit continuous use of the EclipSmart Solar Safe Shades to three minutes, and always directly supervise children under the age of 14 during their use.

WARNING: Never look at the sun without special eye protection. When viewing the eclipse, use eclipse glasses at all times when any part of the sun is visible. Direct viewing of the sun can cause permanent damage if the proper precautions are not taken. Adequate eye protection specifically designed for viewing the sun is essential and should be worn so that no harmful rays from the sun can reach the eye.

Now that you are prepared to view the eclipse safely, get ready to make an incredible memory! This rare occurrence won’t come along for another 18 years and 11 days, so make the most of it. Safe and happy viewing!



June 19th, 2017

#Welcoming150: From Burundi to Saskatchewan

As part of Canada’s 150th anniversary, London Drugs is partnering with agencies across western Canada to help 150 refugee families get on their feet in their new country. The Welcoming 150 program seeks to help by encouraging London Drugs customers to donate items to the families in need.

Many of the families arrived in Canada in the last year or so, and are in the process of learning a new language and joining our country’s workforce. This is one of their extraordinary stories.

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June 22nd, 2016

Mr. Brandt C. Louie honoured by UBC

Our chair and CEO, Mr. Brandt C. Louie, recently received an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from UBC. Mr. Louie was bestowed the honor in recognition of his extraordinary contributions of community leadership and visionary support of learning and research. In his speech, Mr. Louie shares some insightful thoughts on success and words of inspiration for the UBC 2016 graduating class.

Full list of UBC 2016 Honorary Degree Recipients:
http://graduation.ubc.ca/event/honorary-degrees/2016-honorary-degree-recipients/

See more of the convocation and Mr. Louie’s acceptance speech:
https://www.youtube.com/user/ubcceremonies/videos?shelf_id=1&view=0&sort=dd



September 29th, 2015

London Drugs presents computer donation to Surrey Search And Rescue

Earlier this month, the London Drugs computer department at its Cloverdale location made a valuable contribution to the Surrey Search and Rescue. Cedric Tetzel, London Drugs computer buyer, and London Drugs store manager Edwin Chang presented Surrey Search and Rescue vice president Larry Kost, Fundraising Director Michael Surbey and Communications Officer Layla Giuca with eight HP laptops for their operations. READ MORE



June 24th, 2015

London Drugs rides for a reason for Canuck Place Children’s Hospice

On July 19, 2015, the London Drugs Ride for Hope Presto Fondo will take place

London Drugs is proud to announce its support of the Canuck Place Children’s Hospice by sponsoring and taking part in the 2015 London Drugs Ride for Hope Presto Fondo.

The London Drugs Ride for Hope Presto Fondo is a part of the Prospera Valley Fondo. On July 19, 2015, a team of riders from London Drugs will be participating in a 50km bike ride to raise funds and awareness for the Canuck Place Children’s Hospice Provincial Care Program.

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October 27th, 2014

London Drugs Partners with Alberta Food Banks

AB_food_bank

From left to right: Stephanie Rigby – Executive Director of the Alberta Food Banks, Suzan Krecsy – Executive Director of the St. Albert Food Bank, Brenda Marsh – Store Manager of London Drugs in St. Albert, and London Drugs staff members.

London Drugs is proudly celebrating a new partnership with Alberta Food Banks, which will support 10 of its member food banks across Alberta though donations of non-perishable food and hygiene products.

London Drugs has been a long-time supporter of food banks across Alberta through various community initiatives such as Five Hole for Food. However, this marks the company’s first formal commitment to a sustainable program supporting food banks in the province. The company expects to contribute more than 110,000 pounds of food and hygiene products annually.

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October 1st, 2014

RRROCA Community Cleanup a Huge Success

Over 4,500 pounds of electronics and other items diverted from the City of Calgary’s landfills

On September 20, 2014 the communities of Rocky Ridge and Royal Oak participated in a Community Cleanup sponsored by The City of Calgary and London Drugs.

The parking lot of London Drugs Royal Oak was turned into a recycling party with music playing, a Community Appreciation BBQ serving up hot dogs, and a steady stream of recyclers from the community dropping off items at the different charity and recycling stations.

Local charities, Neighborlink and Goods Trading Services together reusing a whole truck load of clothes, household goods, furniture and toys – all being donated to families in need. Habitat for Humanity also collected remnants from renovation projects for use in future construction.

RRROCA-_image1
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